Posts

Different Types of Powerboats

Types of Powerboats

28 Motorboat Types – from Aft-Cabin to Walkaround

If you’ve been browsing our listings for new and used boats, you likely have questions about sizes, styles, makes and models. Because the powerboat market is constantly changing, many categories of powerboats can share characteristics with another type of boat or yacht.

As Western Canada’s yachting experts, we can help make sense of it all.

Whether you need a new dinghy/tender for your yacht, are looking for your very first boat, or would like to upgrade from a cruiser to a luxury model by Pursuit, read on to choose the right boat for your needs.

Powerboat Types

Aft-Cabin: The aft-cabin boat has a stateroom on the stern of the boat. This type of boat has a ladder or stairs to access the cockpit as well as the helm. It is also a flybridge but there is a stateroom located on the stern of the boat.  The inboard engine is centrally located, generally underneath the living room floor.

Bass Boat: Primarily used for fishing on lakes and rivers, this a type of boat with a flat deck, low freeboard and a shallow draft.

Types of Powerboats - Bay BoatBay Boat: The Bay Boat has a low-freeboard centre console and is designed for use near shore and around coastal waters.

Bowrider: A Bowrider is a powerboat with seating in the bow area with room for eight or more people. The v-shaped hull creates a smooth ride inland or in coastal waters.

Cabin Cruiser: Any motorboat with sleeping accommodations within can be called a cabin cruiser. These are perfect for relaxed cruises and have many modern amenities like heaters and air conditioners. Ideal for coastal waters, cabin cruisers have a deep v-shaped hull and a secure drive shaft mechanism.

Catamaran: With dual hulls, a catamaran is more stable than other types of power boats, but it’s also much pricier. Catamarans are a crossover powerboat, with sails as well as engines.

Types of Powerboats - Center Console

Center Console: A powerboat with the steering station in the centre of the boat. These crafts generally have an outboard motor and are perfect for ocean cruising with larger waves.

Convertible: A larger sized boat with a flybridge built on top of the cabin and an open cockpit aft. These are favoured for weekend cruising.

Cuddy Cabin: A powerboat with a relatively small, no frills cabin on its bow section. Good as a weekender for cruising the coast.

Deck Boat: This has a flat, open deck plan and no accommodations below decks. Most deck boats are box shaped, creating more forward deck space.

Dinghy: Using small outboard motors, a dinghy or tender can be inflatable or hard-sided. They’re used for transporting people and their belongings to and from shore.
Types of Powerboats - Dual Console

Dual Console: A boat with twin dashboards, separated by a walk-through that accesses a forward cockpit or seating area.

Express Boat: A sleek boat with a steering station on deck level, no flybridge, and a cabin that is forward and lower than the helm.

Fishing Boat:  Easily maneuverable, most fishing boats usually have a front bow, features like rod holders, live well compartments and trolling motors.

Flats Boat: This is a skiff used for fishing in shallow-water areas.

Flybridge:  Boat with a helm above the interior cabin that is accessed by stairs or a ladder. This provides more vision while navigating the boat and adds more living space underneath.

Houseboat: Built on a barge-like hull, a houseboat acts as a floating RV. Also known as float houses, houseboats can be bare bones or loaded with luxurious extras and are ideal for entertaining and enjoying water sports. Some can be used for cruising, while others are moored in place.

Jon Boat: Usually made of aluminum, a Jon boat is a small utilitarian boat with a flat bottom.

Megayacht: A yacht exceeding 200 feet and reaching up to 500 feet, megayachts are custom-made and accessible to only the wealthiest in the world. Featuring luxuries like large swimming pools, heliport, 3 or more guest rooms and room for a full crew of around 30 people, megayachts are decadent floating resorts.

Pontoon Boat: Built on two or more aluminum pontoons, a pontoon boat has a flat deck and a perimeter fence and is most often used for tour groups.

Rigid Inflatable Boat: Also known as RIBs, a Rigid Inflatable Boat is an inflatable boat built around a rigid hull made of fibreglass or aluminum.

Types of Powerboats - Sedan BridgeSedan Bridge:  In a Sedan Bridge, the cockpit is almost at the same level as the boat’s aft deck. This means that there’s no need to climb stairs or a ladder to reach the cockpit. The Sedan Bridge and Sport Bridge are similar in that they both offer easy access to the cockpit.

Skiff: Skiffs have a flat bottom and pointed bow, making them ideal for navigating shallow water. In many different sizes and lengths, skiffs are easy to operate with a basic steering console.

Superyacht: A superyacht is a yacht that is over 100 feet but less than 200 feet long. With multiple accommodations and multiple decks, a living room, galley and lounges, it’s meant for hosting many guests and enjoying fun in the sun out on the water.

Skylounge: A Flybridge with an enclosed cockpit, the Skylounge offers exceptional comfort for the captain and people accompanying the captain. With air conditioning, a sofa, a full bar, tv and many other amenities, the cockpit is fully protected from the elements.

Types of Powerboats - Trawler

Trawler: A long-distance recreational vessel that resembles commercial trawlers, this boat is ruggedwith a displacement hull and efficient engine(s). Made for long-haul cruising with minimal horsepower and fuel consumption, trawlers have all modern facilities on board for optimal comfort.

PWC (Personal Watercraft): PWC boats, also known as water scooters and jet skis, are designed for fun and adventure. Sit down models are meant for two or more people, while stand up models are meant for one rider.

Walkaround: Built with side decks around the cabin, a walkaround boat lets passengers easily walk around the cabin and up to the foredeck.

 

At Van Isle Marina, our team of certified brokers specialize in matching skippers like you with their perfect boat. If we don’t have it in stock, we will search the world over to locate it. To get started on your search, browse our boats and yachts for sale, call us, or visit our world-class sales dock at 2320 Harbour Rd in Sidney, BC.

The benefits of outboard motors

The Benefits of an Outboard Engine

Today’s Outboard Motors Aren’t What You Might Expect—They’re Even Better

When shopping for a new boat, you’re going to need the right engine to make your time on the water as carefree as possible. While you might automatically think that an inboard will be quieter and more powerful, you might be surprised to know that today’s outboard motors are extremely convenient. They’re designed to be quieter, more fuel efficient and more flexible than the loud, gas-guzzling 2/3 stroke engines of the past. While idling at the dock, you might even forget that your 4 stroke gas outboards are still running.

benefits of outboard motors - pursuit boats

Adding one, two, or even a triple threat of outboards to your boat lets yachts over 25 feet power through even the toughest ocean currents while maintaining a top speed. Depending on what you’ll use your new boat for, the pros of an outboard engine might just make you reconsider an inboard engine package on your next pleasure craft or fishing vessel.

“There’s been a shift in the market … that has seen a lot of customers move into the outboard-style product primarily because of its performance, ease of maintenance and all the other great things that outboards give you.”- David Glenn, director of marketing at S2 Yachts.

Some Key Benefits of Outboard Motors

Lower Initial Investment

benefits of outboard motors - twin yamahas

Outboard engines generally cost less up front and the newer engines are made to last anywhere from 2,500-3,000 hours. That’s a lot of time spent enjoying your boat! For what’s most often a lower upfront sticker price, this can be a huge pro for many boaters who might want to spend more on on-board features and upgrades (there are plenty of customized and upgrade options on our Pursuit Boats including the option to upgrade to Yamaha outboards with Digital Electronic Controls (DEC.))

Better Versatility

This is a huge selling point for many of our customers, since the ability to lift motors up allows boats to squeeze into shallower spots and be able to move easily from ocean to rivers and lakes and back again. Being able to reduce your draft (the depth of the boat’s keel in the water) lets you enjoy a wider variety of waterways without worrying about getting stuck in the shallows.

One of the biggest advantages of lifting the engine out of the water when not in use, it keeps sensitive parts, including the propeller in good working condition by not being constantly immersed in salt water.

More Room on Board

Outboard motors are mounted on the transom. Without the real estate needed for an inboard and all its components, you can enjoy quite a bit of extra space on the transom. This means additional bench seating, more space to clean your catch, more room for water sports equipment and greater overall real estate on deck. The majority of our Pursuit models come equipped with folding transom seats with integrated storage and Pursuit’s patented backrest for comfort and convenience.

Easier Access for Maintenance

It needs to be said that outboard motors do need just as much maintenance as inboards since they have similar components like pumps and water-cooling systems. They require filter and fluid changes just like inboards do, there are fuel lines, tanks and many other components that need to be kept up to par. The big difference here is that outboard motors are freely accessible and you can always see the engines. If you have multiple outboards mounted, your maintenance time and costs will increase since each individual engine needs to be looked after, but generally, outboards tend to be lower maintenance.

More Efficient Power

The newer outboard motors are extremely powerful with better fuel economy, faster performance and more efficient power. Compared with in-board propulsion systems, using multiple outboard engines creates more speed due to the positive power to weight ratio.

Modern Technology

With today’s modern outboards, the skipper can sit comfortably at the helm and control all the outboards using Digital Electronic Controls, joystick steering, autopilot, even automatic trim. Cruising with outboards on a single console, double console or offshore model is every bit as relaxed as cruising with the same (or better!) performance you’d find with an inboard model.

benefits of outboard engines - pursuit boats

Since 1977, Pursuit Boats have been designed and manufactured with extreme pride and care in the USA. Hand laminated hulls, one of the quietest cabins on the market and luxurious extras like custom fabrics and solid wood accents are just a few of the yacht-calibre features of these vessels.

With fifteen different boats across four categories ranging in size from 23 to 42 feet, you can choose from Offshore, Centre Console, Dual Console and Sport models, all powered by dependable Yamaha outboards. Each Pursuit model comes with attractive warranties, such as:

  • Ultra-premium gelcoat backed by a five-year hull blister warranty
  • Transferable five-year hull and deck structural warranty; and
  • Transferable two-year component warranty.

 

Looking to upgrade to more power and impressive technology to make the most of your next adventure? At Van Isle Marina, we’re pleased to be the exclusive Western Canada dealer for Pursuit Boats and we want to match you up with your dream yacht. From cruiser to megayacht, contact us or visit our world-class sales dock at 2320 Harbour Rd in beautiful Sidney, BC today.

How Far Can Yachts Travel

How Far Can Yachts Travel?

Pairing the Length of your Trip with the Right Yacht

Cruising the world is a dream for many, and there’s no better way to do it than in your own yacht. When it comes to the question of how far yachts can travel, there’s no one set answer for this. There are so many different types of yachts, all designed for travel ranging from open ocean exploration to island hopping.

Really, there’s no limit to how far or how long a yacht can travel, if it’s suited to the trip you have in mind. The success of your trip will depend on how well your goals mesh with the category of yacht. It will also depend on whether you’re captaining a sailing or motor yacht, how often you need to stop to refuel or restock supplies and what forms of auxiliary power are used aboard. Whether your goal is to yacht around the world or explore the coastline closer to home, there is a yacht designed for the voyage you envision.

To Determine How Far a Yacht Will Be Able to Travel, Ask:

  • Is it a sailing yacht or motor yacht?
  • What type of yacht?
  • How large is the yacht?
  • How large is the fuel tank?

Sailing Yachtsailing - how far can you sail

A sailing yacht will take you anywhere you want to go. With a capable skipper, a seaworthy, well-maintained yacht and the right sailing conditions, you can see the whole world.  A fully stocked, seaworthy 30-foot sailing yacht will sail about 100 nautical miles in a day, and she can continue up to 90 days without needing to stop. Given the right wind conditions, a sailing yacht in good shape can sail around the clock at a steady pace of about 5 knots per hour. A longer yacht with a larger hull will have a faster average speed and cover more distance than a smaller vessel.

Motorized Yachtyachts - how far can they go

It gets more complicated with motorized yachts since they rely heavily on a fuel source. If your parameters are how far a motorized yacht can go on a single tank of gas, this depends on the size of the boat and the fuel tank.

The general rule is the bigger the vessel, the larger the fuel tank. For instance, a 75-foot motorized vessel that can carry 11,000 litres of fuel can travel about 1500 nautical miles, depending on conditions, whereas a 35-45 foot motorized yacht with a 100-litre tank can travel about 400 nautical miles.

However, a larger fuel tank doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get that much further, since a larger boat would typically weigh more, have a larger crew, have more items contained inside and have more equipment—just to name a few variables.

Follow These Steps to Determine How Far Your Yacht Will be Able to Travel on A Single Tank of Fuel:

  • Clean your yacht, make sure that everything is working correctly. A maintained yacht will have better fuel economy.
  • Refuel your boat and always log engine hours as well as the times when you stop and start. This will narrow down how fast you go through fuel.
  • Measure in litres or gallons per hour rather than relying on your fuel gauge, which doesn’t always account for conditions on the water.

What Type of Auxiliary Power Sources Does the Yacht Have?yachting on the open seas

Other than the fuel tank, yachts can run on wind, sun, and water power, options that can power amenities on board the yacht and push it that much further on its voyage in between fuelings. Options for alternative power sources include:

  • Solar generators – Solar panels charge the boat’s batteries and hold a charge for when backup power is used. Some solar panels on the market today are so thin and flexible that they can be fixed onto or incorporated right into the sails
  • Wind generators – Not just for sailing yachts, wind generators harness the power of the wind to charge the yacht’s batteries
  • Hydro generators – Like upside down wind generators, hydro (water) generators are fixed to the transom and can be used to run systems on board, ranging from lights to water heaters
  • Outboard motors – Useful on smaller vessels, outboard motors can be used as a backup if the on-board engine should ever experience technical problems

Categories of Yachts

There are four main categories of yachts. It’s important to know which category your yacht falls into in order to plan and prepare for your trip.

Category A

Also known as Explorer or Expedition Yachts, Category A yachts are crewed and designed for open ocean. They have a large hull that can handle waves up to 23 feet high. These yachts can also handle extraordinarily strong winds, up to 47 knots.

Category B

These yachts are also worthy of the wider seas but are not capable of crossing oceans and are less capable of strong winds and rough water. They can handle waves up to 13 feet high.

Category C

Used inshore, Category C yachts are ideal for larger bays and lakes. They can handle waves up to about 7 feet high.

Category D

Great for sheltered areas like lakes, protected harbours and rivers, these are vessels meant for day trips. Category D yachts can travel in areas with waves reaching under 4 feet high.

At Van Isle Marina, we have many new and used yachts suited to whatever trip you desire – from a week spent cruising just off the coast of Vancouver Island, to a full tour of the Atlantic Ocean. We are also the exclusive West Coast dealers of Pursuit Boats. Contact our team of experienced brokers today or come and view our world-class sales dock in Sidney, BC to find the boat that’s right for you.

10 Costs you must know before buying a boat

10 Costs You Must Know Before Buying a Boat

Understanding the True Cost of Boat Ownership

 

While it’s tempting to look at the sticker price of a boat for sale and get caught up in the dream, we always caution our customers on the additional costs of boat ownership they need to consider. After all, it’s easy to underestimate what it takes to own a boat, which is why our yacht brokers always take new boat owners through all the costs that may arise.

Our brokers want our customers to love their boats wholeheartedly and feel excited every time they are out on the water – not struggle to make payments and end up experiencing buyer’s remorse.

Keeping the following costs in mind while shopping for your first boat is strongly recommended in order to stay comfortably within your budget.

1. Fuel and Other Operating Costscost of owning a boat - fuel

Operating costs vary a lot based on the type of boat. For example, the cost of fuel will naturally vary according to the age, size, and style of your boat (sport vs day cruiser; motor yacht vs sailboat, etc). There are also expenses associated with oil, batteries, pumps, lights, and specialized equipment and other rations that ultimately will need replenishing. These will all need to be budgeted for appropriately.

Fuel and operating costs are never an exact science, but your yacht broker and experienced boater family and friends will happily share some insights with you and can assist you in knowing what to budget for these items.

2. Boat Insurance

The cost to insure your boat against damages will depend on things like the size and age of the boat, where it will be docked, the types of activities it will be used for, and other factors. On top of insurance for your actual vessel, you might also be required to have liability insurance and damage coverage.

Insurance costs can certainly add up, making them one of the highest costs of boat ownership, but like all insurances, it’s a necessary evil if you want to moor your boat anywhere. At Van Isle Marina, we can refer you to some excellent insurance brokers who can assist you.

3. Moorage and Storagecosts of owning a boat - moorage

Mooring a boat at a marina or storing your boat on land in a storage facility will come with various costs that differ a lot among marinas and facilities. For example, a secure storage facility might cost considerably less overall than mooring your boat in the water at a municipal marina, private marina, or exclusive yacht club. These costs can range from a hundred dollars to a thousand dollars (or more) per month.

Fees are often calculated per foot of your vessel, and paid for monthly or annually. Discuss with your yacht broker where you will be storing your new boat, specifically mentioning whether it will be stored in water or on land, as this cost will definitely affect how much boat you can afford. See Van Isle Marina’s moorage rates to get an idea of what moorage and storage could cost you.

In addition to the moorage fee, some marinas may also charge for things like live aboard fees, optional car parking, and utility fees for electrical power and fresh water supplies.

4. Trailercost of owning a boat - trailer

With most smaller boat purchases comes an inevitable trailer purchase. The trailer is a key component of boat ownership. At some point you’ll need one to haul your boat in and out of the water.

Sometimes the trailer you’ll use to haul your boat is an entirely separate purchase, while sometimes it’s included in the price of the boat you’re buying. Whatever the case may be, you’ll need to do more than just consider the outright purchase of the trailer – there are the additional maintenance costs of the trailer, with tires and brakes being the two biggest ticket items, on top of insurance and any potential storage costs if you cannot keep the trailer on your property.

5. Maintenance and Repairscost of owning a boat - maintenance

It’s common to hear from boat owners that a boat’s maintenance costs are approximately 5-10% of the value of the boat per year. However, it’s tough to go off of such a percentage. There are so many factors that affect a boat’s maintenance cost and schedule, with the obvious ones being how often it is used, and in what weather conditions.

Things that need maintaining are waxing and painting of the hull and engine tune-ups, while things that might need frequent repair are plumbing and electrical issues – again, it all depends on the age of your vessel, your make and model, and how much sweat equity you’re able to contribute.

6. Equipment & Accessories

You’ll need to outfit your new boat with all the essential elements that are required for a day out on the water, including lifejackets, cleaning supplies, towels, fishing tackle, first aid supplies, water sports equipment, and more. Some of these are relatively minor one-time expenses, but they all contribute to your overall cost of owning a boat.

7. Extras & Add-onscost of owning a boat - fishing equipment

Just like brand new cars, boats can come standard (factory built) or come with several optional add-ons to enhance the experience of the ride. Your desire and ability to opt for these extras will depend on your budget and how much you are willing to invest.

Be prepared for the ticket price of your desired model to go up when you factor in your desired extras. This could include things like upgraded upholstery packages, sportfishing packages, GPS systems, anchoring system, laundry rooms, engine power, and the list goes on. You name it, there is probably an upgrade for it in the boating world!

8. Warranties & Interest

There might be the option to purchase extended warranties on some new models. Study these closely and be sure you understand what is already covered by the limited warranty, and what the extension of the extended warranty will cover.

If you’ll be financing your new boat, the amount of interest you’ll pay over time should also be considered an additional cost of boat ownership.

9. Certification & Registration

If you’re brand new to boating, there is a mandatory boating safety course to take in order to get your Pleasure Craft Operator Card. And if you have a VHF marine radio on board, one person on board must also carry a Restricted Operator Certificate (Maritime). These are not overly expensive to obtain, but they are costs associated with boat ownership nonetheless. If you want to take it a step further, registering your boat (for a fee) is yet another option.

Read more about the documentation you need to operate a boat.

10. Depreciation

Some boats hold their value more than others, which, in a roundabout way, can be considered a cost of boat ownership. When you go to sell your new boat to move on to something you like better, be prepared for some depreciation if you’re the original owner of the boat you’re selling. A yacht broker can advise you on any particular model’s potential resale value if depreciation is a concern to you.

See our post on Buying a Pre-Owned Yacht for more tips on budgeting for as much yacht as you can afford. We can help you find something within reach!

At Van Isle Marina, our brokers want you to feel comfortable and understand all aspects of the yachting lifestyle, including the costs. We are standing by, ready to help you navigate the experience of buying your first boat. Learn more about our sales process and how you can apply online for financing. We look forward to helping you find and afford the boat of your dreams!

Pros and cons of chartering your yacht

Chartering Your Yacht

Understanding the Pros and Cons of Chartering Your Yacht

 

Picture this scenario – you have just returned home from your very first outing on your brand new luxury motor yacht. While on holiday, you enjoyed a two-week, fun-filled vacation cruise down to California.

Returning home feeling refreshed and rejuvenated, you look forward to the next chance you have to take out your yacht again, only to realize that the next opportunity you have to escape is still weeks or months away.

In the meantime, your yacht goes unused and un-enjoyed, when in fact it could be making you money while being well-maintained as part of a chartered fleet.

If this sounds appealing to you, read on to learn more about yacht chartering and to see if entering your yacht into a chartered yacht fleet could be a possibility for you.

What Does It Mean to Charter Your Yacht?

Chartering your yacht, or enrolling in a yacht charter income program, refers to private boat owners making their yachts available to others to rent out while they are not using them. This is typically done through a yacht charter company.

Companies typically ask their chartered boat owners to make the boat available for a minimum of ten weeks a year. Owners can reserve or block off time in advance for their own use, and earn about 60% of the income generated by the charter company.

Boat Owner Responsibilitieschartering your boat costs - moorage

When chartering your yacht, you as a boat owner are responsible for:

  • Paying for moorage and insurance
  • Paying for all routine and required maintenance costs
  • Ensuring your boat is moored at the home of the charter company, as needed
  • Providing all required safety equipment in good working order as mandated by Transport Canada
  • Providing dinnerware, stemware, and cooking utensils for the galley

Charter Company Responsibilities

When your vessel is in a charter company’s hands, they are responsible for:

  • Paying for promoting and selling time on your boat
  • Providing fresh linens and bedding
  • Screening all new clients and showing them around
  • Inspecting, cleaning, fuelling, and restocking the boat once returned

Yacht Criteria

Not all yachts are eligible for chartering. Before considering if chartering your yacht is right for you, consider the following criteria. If you have yet to purchase your yacht and are planning to rely on chartering to offset yacht ownership costs, check with the chartering company first to see what types of vessels they are accepting.

The majority of yacht charter businesses are looking for vessels that:

  • Are a well-known, highly sought after make or model
  • Are no more than five years old (with exceptions!)
  • Are in immaculate condition
  • Are equipped with a reliable engine or solid sails
  • Are equipped with a motorized dinghy or tender
  • Have a well-equipped galley
  • Are in the 40 to 54-foot length range
  • Have 3 double cabins and more than one head (bathroom)
  • Vessels that are slightly smaller or larger than the 40 to 54-foot range may still be accepted, depending on their condition, amenities, and make and model.
  • Yachts that can sleep more than one couple, for example, a 33’ or 34’ boat that has a double bed and toilet ensuite, with another single or double bunk, are also sometimes accepted, based on need.

So, if your yacht, or the yacht you’re thinking of buying, meets the criteria above, it’s time to consider the pros and cons of chartering.

Pros of Chartering Your Yacht

Offsets the Costs of Owning a Boat

While chartering your yacht won’t be a huge income generator, a successful chartering season will likely bring in enough to cover dockage, routine maintenance, and insurance fees. This works out to be a 30 to 70% reduction in operating expenses, which can make a significant difference.  If you’ve been on the fence about buying a luxury motor yacht due to your budget, there are two main things you can do to mitigate the cost of boat ownership:

  • Find an older boat or yacht to renovate; or
  • Charter your motor yacht through a reputable yacht charterer.

Chartering is considerably less work than renovating an old boat, and comes with added perks such as:

Gentle Use is a Good Thing 

Boats benefit from getting a little bit of exercise out on the water. Although it sounds counterintuitive, a yacht that doesn’t get used much tends to have more issues than one that is used routinely. The reason is because fuel lingering in tanks isn’t good, and the boat doesn’t get much air circulation when it’s sealed up in storage. On the other hand, when you have your yacht in a charter program, it typically means nothing will seize up or mold out on you.

Regular Cleaning and Maintenance Routinechartering your yacht requires maintenance

Having your yacht in a charter fleet is a great way to ensure it will get professionally maintained, as they typically have a stricter maintenance schedule. These regular servicing appointments will serve you well into the future after your yacht “ages out” of the fleet. As for cleanliness, the charter company staff will ensure your yacht is cleaned and made up for the next guests after every charter.

Marketing Your Boat 

Having your yacht out in a charter will give your boat a higher profile within the yachting community. This will help with re-sale, as the more people who become familiar with your boat and get to experience it, the better. We have found that a lot of prospective buyers of motor yachts are looking to buy because they have had a good experience using a chartered yacht previously.

Sharing is Caring

Sharing the beauty of your yacht with others can be a bit of an ego boost for proud yacht owners, providing a psychological benefit on top of the financial benefit. If you’ve gone to great lengths to customize your yacht, you’ll certainly appreciate everyone’s rave reviews on your style and taste. The effect is similar to homeowners who rent their homes on AirBnB.

Tax Advantages 

If you work closely with an accountant, you might be able to write off some expenses as business expenses associated with chartering, or otherwise receive tax benefits.

Cons of Chartering Your Yacht

Strangers on Your Yacht

While the charter company screens guests, you’ll still end up having strangers on board your boat. This certainly doesn’t appeal to all yacht owners. If you don’t think you’d be able to handle strangers occupying your home on the water, chartering might not work out for you.

Not Being Able to Stow Your Own Stuff 

When lending your yacht to a chartered fleet, you’ll be required to remove the majority of your personal belongings, including clothing, towels, toiletries, and groceries. This means having to pack these things back onto the boat each time you want to use it.

Insurance Fees May Go Up 

You’ll likely need to increase the amount of insurance you have on your boat, depending on how often you’ll be chartering your boat for. The price increase could be modest, but it could be substantial, so just be aware.

Increased Usage 

With increased usage comes a small amount of wear and tear. Some wear and tear can be a good thing (see point above about keeping the boat exercised), while some wear and tear isn’t beneficial. For example, chartering puts more hours on the engine, and if your yacht has carpets, these will likely need some TLC after a few seasons of chartering. Fortunately, revenues generated by your charter experience will likely far outweigh the cost of said wear and tear.

To Charter, or Not to Charter?

The pros and cons of chartering your yacht can be complex, as they will be unique to your situation, location, and style of boat you own. After weighing the pros and cons, only you can say for certain whether or not chartering your yacht makes sense for you and your situation. If you’re on the fence, don’t hesitate to interview several charter companies to find the right fit.

 

If you have any questions about chartering your yacht, or about yacht ownership in general, we’d love to hear from you – simply contact us with any questions you might have.

We can also help you find the perfect boat that would also be suitable for chartering. See what boats we have for sale at our sales dock right now. At Van Isle Marina, our brokers are here to help you navigate the world of luxury yachting.