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Boating Terms & Terminology

A Glossary of Yachting Lingo

 

Whether you’ve got a solid pair of sea legs or are brand new to the boating life, you probably know that yachting and boating comes with its own language.

Boating terms go back centuries and a lot of sailing vocabulary has been adopted as commonly used idioms in our everyday life. Many of us use them as second nature without even realizing their true origins. Just for fun, we’ve matched up a few of the most popular boating phrases with their everyday definition and use.

Expand your yachting vocabulary and have fun impressing your landlubber friends with your newfound knowledge. You’re about to get to know the meanings of phrases like “Anchors aweigh!”, “Move to the cathead” and “Crank the windlass.”

Need a Refresher Course on Boat Parts and Basic Lingo? Take a Look at Our Past Posts Before Casting Off

Basic Boating Lingo

Parts of a Boat

Basics of Marine Navigation

 

List of Boating Terminology 

Abreast- boats sailing side by side at the same speed and position.

Everyday Use: we often use the term “abreast” to mean stay informed or updated. “Please keep me abreast of any changes in the plan.”

Aft- towards the stern (back) of the boat.

Belay- secure a line by winding on a cleat or pin.

Bitter End – the last part of a line or chain.Boat terms and terminology - Bitter End

Everyday Use: When all other possibilities are exhausted and someone reaches the very end.
“They fought to the bitter end”

Cast Off – to remove the line from the dock or mooring. To move out.

Cathead – where the anchor is secured near the bow.

Charts – charts on the water are the same as maps on land. Charting can be done on paper or electronically using ENC (Electronic Navigational Chart).

Come Around – turn into the wind.

Boat terms and terminology - Dolphin Pilings

Everyday Use: When referring to someone potentially changing their mind or opinion. “They’ll come around, you’ll see.”

Course – steering towards your destination.

Draft – the vertical depth of a yacht below the waterline. Knowing the draft helps to navigate through shallow water.

Dolphin – A group of pilings bound together by cables.

Fathom – a fathom is a unit of measurement for 6 feet or 1.8288 metres. A fathom is typically the length of rope that a grown man or woman can extend with outstretched arms. Before modern technology, depth was measured by counting fathoms and lowering the line into the sea.

Everyday Use: When trying to figure something out, you are trying to get to the bottom of it. “I can’t fathom why she would do something like that.”

Gunwale – the top edge on the side of a boat.

Boat terms and terminology - Heeling Sailboat

Heeling – When you’re heeling, your sails are filled and your boat is leaning over, being pushed by the wind. To reach top speed, you want to be heeling.

Iron Wind – a nickname for the engine of the yacht.

Jibe – a jibe is a more complex way of changing direction that requires moving the stern into and through the wind and moving the mainsail to the other side of the boat. After a jibe, the wind direction will have changed from one side of the boat to the other. Whether you choose to tack or jibe entirely depends on the situation, what’s around you and the direction of the wind.

Everyday Use: To complement or match with something.
“Your story doesn’t jibe with his story.”

Chicken Jibe – tacking more than 180° to avoid a jibe is sometimes called a chicken jibe.

Kedge – A small anchor used to change the direction or pivot point. Can also be used as an additional anchor in bad weather.

Lazy Jack – A bag attached to the boom for the mainsail to fall into.

Lines – on a yacht or any type of boat, ropes become known as lines.

Mainstay – the main line that is used to support a mast.

Everyday Use: An essential part of something.
“A good quality engine is the mainstay of a yacht.”

Payout – to add slack to the line.

Reefing – reining in the sails during periods of strong wind.

Tack – tack is used as both a verb and a noun.

Verb: to change direction by turning the bow through the wind.

Noun: the course you are on, relative to the location of the wind. You are either on a starboard tack or a port tack, depending on which side the wind is blowing.

Three Sheets to the Wind – sailing with all of your sails (sheets) unsecured.

Everyday Use: Used to describe someone who is thoroughly drunk.
“I heard Bob was three sheets to the wind last night.”

True Wind – Wind as measured on land, as opposed to how wind appears on a moving yacht (known as apparent wind).

Weigh – Raise the anchor.

Boat terms and terminology - Windlass

Everyday Use: Getting something underway.
Contrary to popular belief, the phrase is “anchors aweigh”, rather than “anchors away”
 

Windlass – the winch used to raise the anchor

To round out your boating knowledge, you might also want to read up on old boating superstitions. Learn about good and bad luck omens that tie into the history of yachting and never be pressed for an icebreaker again.

Ready to start up the engine of a beautiful yacht? Whether you’re brand new to yachting or have years of experience at the helm, we offer a wide variety of new and pre-loved boats. Our experienced brokers are happy to help you choose the perfect yacht for your lifestyle. Come visit us in Sidney, BC near Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal!

Boating with Family

Planning on a Family Vacation out on the Water?
Keep These 11 Tips in Mind

The weather is warming up out there, and we know many, many happy boaters who are eager to be heading out on the water with their families to mark the official start of boating season.

A family boating vacation is the perfect way to escape the hustle and bustle of your everyday routine. It’s a chance to slow down, bond with your family, bond with your boat, and otherwise get back to nature.

It also just so happens that time on your yacht or motorboat is the best form of self-isolation that our Van Isle Marina staff can think of. Whether you’re practicing social distancing, or you’ve been planning this boating vacation for awhile now, here are 11 tips to help make your next trip out on the boat with your kids and teenagers a fun, memorable vacation.

1. Safety First

Practise Safety with kids on board

Depending on the ages of the children who will be on board, there are certain extra safety precautions you can take, such as adding a safety net to the deck to help everyone relax easier. Go over all the safety precautions with young children, especially to remind them of the rules of no running and throwing things.

Ensure handrails are all intact, walkways are well lit come nightfall, and the cockpit is anti-slip. And, we hope it goes without saying that a properly stocked first aid kit and properly fitted life jackets are definitely must-haves. Whenever possible, we recommend fitting and testing everyone’s life jackets in a swimming pool before packing them on the boat.

 

2. Pack the Essentials

pack essentials when boating with family

A great vacation requires packing the right supplies. On top of entertainment, which we will cover in a minute, you need to pack enough of the essentials. For everyone on board this means fresh drinking water, enough food and snacks for all to enjoy, sunscreen of various strengths, bug spray, swimsuits, and towels.

Ensure the kids are packed up with spare clothing, hats, sunglasses, proper footwear, and their favourite comfort toys – then do the same thing for yourself. Remember to stow it all in soft-sided luggage to make storage easier.

3. Hire a Crew Member

If your boat and budget can manage it, considering hiring a crew member to help you captain the boat. Bringing a crew member on board can help you relax and enjoy time with family by tending to the navigation of the boat, and maybe some cooking and cleaning as well.

When hiring an extra crew member, look for someone who is not just a skilled boater, but someone who knows the local area and can perhaps steer you towards new areas. You might learn more about your local area and tour some great new places, all while making memories with your family.

4. Relax Your Schedule

When travelling with more than two people, you may find that you’ll be better off relaxing your schedule a little bit. Throw your timetable and packed itinerary overboard!

family boating trips - Relax

Sailing is all about the journey, so don’t be in a rush to get from destination to destination. Be realistic, and if heading to the shore, give yourself enough time to explore the area and find activities that will please as many people in your group as possible.

You might set out for a destination, but never know what there is to see between point A and point B – maybe it’s a cool little island, a secret bay, or a pod of whales? You might even reach a destination that required a bit more time than you predicted it would. Of course there is always weather and the tides to navigate as well, leave yourself a lot of room to get from place to place.

All that being said, keep trips short when introducing young children to boating.

5. Entertainment

Cover your entertainment needs with water toys such as floaties, snorkeling gear, stand-up paddle boards, fishing rods

entertainment during family boating vacation

, and more. You’ll also want to ensure there are lots of indoor entertainment options as well. Think board games, card games, books, arts and crafts, music, and movies. Depending on everyone’s interest, stargazing at night, or birdwatching with binoculars in the day could al

so be fun things to try.

Have your kids pick their favourite activities to pack along, and consider keeping them reserved as special boating activities. You might also be packing along tablets and smartphones, but try and limit screen time for relaxing once the sun goes down. Be sure to invest in waterproof, floatable protective cases for your electronic devices so they don’t sink to the bottom if accidentally dropped.

6. Involve Your Kids

Involve your kids when boating

If they’re old enough and interested enough, try and involve your kids in all aspects of boating. Show them the equipment, have them steer the boat, teach them how to tie all the knots, identify all the day markers, and explain all the boating terminology you know. Even if it’s just from an observational standpoint while you’re docking, anchoring, or communicating on the VHF radio, involving your kids in the boating process will surely create fond memories for everyone.

7. Get Off the Boat

boating vacations - get off the boat

If time allows, try and get off the boat for a few hours here and there to enjoy some hiking, caving, bike riding, or local sightseeing. You might find the perfect beach for swimming, sandcastles, kayak rentals, ice cream cones, kite flying, a game of frisbee or badminton, or boutique shopping. Do a bit of research ahead of time to learn about any attractions on the coastal areas where you’ll be heading. From wildlife sanctuaries, to museums, to freshwater lakes, there is so much you can add to your boating vacation.

8. Create Kid-Friendly Hangout Areas

If boating with a teenager, it might help to give them a private space all to themselves. Likewise, a nervous young child might also appreciate having a safety zone such as a fort they create, all to themselves. And, if the boat is big enough, try to avoid kids having to share beds. Unless of course, they are siblings who happen to get along swimmingly all the time! A week or more of sharing a bed with their little brother or sister might not lead to any happy children on board.

For very young children, bring a small, portable playpen, which will come in extremely handy, especially one with a mosquito net and sunshade.

9. Tidy Up Every Day

Even a large yacht can start to feel small once a whole family starts to spread out over the course of a few hours. While at home you might leave toys out overnight, this might not be as realistic in smaller living spaces. Try and encourage kids to clean up their activities as soon as they’re done playing, or at the very least, at the end of the evening before bed. And of course, take care of wet bathing suits and towels so they are good and dry the next day.

10. Take Time For Yourself

Alone Time during family boating trips

Once the kids are asleep – which will likely be early, as a day full of swimming and fresh air is bound to tire them out – make sure you fit in some grown up time with your better half. For example, why not share a bottle of wine on the deck?

Family boating vacations need not be just for the kids! You’ll appreciate this time to unwind after a successful day on the water, and plan ahead for the next day.

11. Take Plenty of Photos and Videos

pack lifejackets on family boating trips

Taking photos and videos of your family vacation is always a good idea – boat or no boat! You’ll enjoy the memories and you get to frame your favourite ones for a year-round reminder of how great your vacation was. If you have young photographers on board, entrust them with a waterproof disposable camera they can take out on their floaties with them and snap away.

For more boating tips from Van Isle Marina, be sure to check out the rest of our blog.

Sailing Around the world in a yacht

Tips for Long Range Cruising

Sailing Around the World? Here’s How to Prepare

Before taking your motor yacht or sailboat out on the open ocean for weeks, months, or years at a time, there are a lot of important things to consider. Here is a list of things you need to do to prepare for life on the open sea.

Read More: Important Items to Bring on Your Boat

  1. Communications Plansailing around the world on a yacht
  • Inform your family and friends back home of your approximate travel itinerary. This is mainly so they don’t worry about your whereabouts.
  • As cellphone fees can be extraordinary out at sea, plan ahead by expanding your data plan. And keep in mind that relying on a cellphone alone will not be adequate for long range cruising.
  • Ensure you have a working VHF radio onboard and that everyone knows how to use it. A VHF is essential for weather updates, making or responding to mayday calls, and communicating with your fellow cruisers. Make sure your EPIRB (emergency position-indicating radio beacon) is also in working order.
  1. Paperwork
  • Ensure you have acquired all the necessary paperwork required to operate your boat. This includes your Registration papers (registration required if leaving Canada) , boat insurance, VHF operator’s certificate, and personal photo identification (passports) for everyone onboard.
  • Research any applicable visa requirements for the destination countries you’ll be visiting for long periods of time.
  • Plan to obtain all of the paperwork you need well before your intended cast off date to avoid disappointment if paperwork isn’t filed in time.
  • Make sure your financials are in order. Pick up foreign currency if you can ahead of time, and let your credit card companies know you’ll be travelling.
  • Consider any additional paperwork, such as for your pets.
  1. Pack the Right Provisions
  • Stock your yacht with specialty foods you won’t be able to get in other parts of the world that you might be craving. Some examples include your favourite condiments, coffee and teas, cereals, candies, chocolates, canned soups, and sodas.
  • Pack produce that has a long shelf life, like apples and oranges, carrots, celery, and onions, while avoiding produce that perishes quickly, like bananas.
  • You can typically source staple foods like rice and beans from your destination countries.sailing around the world tips - life jacket
  • Remember that going to restaurants while moored or anchored is one of the major expenses of sailing around the world that can be drastically reduced by preparing as much as you can onboard your yacht.
  1. Toiletries and Medications
  • Planning to have enough of the right toiletries and medication on board might take more foresight than you’d think. It takes time to book appointments with your doctor and get prescriptions filled, depending on your physician. Don’t leave this to the last minute!
  • Don’t overstock items like over the counter medications, as these have expiration dates. You might also be able to find common OTC medications at your destination countries for much cheaper.
  • Check the contents of your First Aid Kit and find out who on board your boat is familiar with everything in it. Does more than one person on board have First Aid training?
  1. Mechanical, Electrical,& Plumbing
  • A boat mechanic can be hard to come by when you’re at sea, so do all you can to learn about the mechanics of your boat. You want to be able to troubleshoot and repair your yacht’s engines and mechanical systems yourself as much as possible. Take classes, watch YouTube videos, and find other boaters who can give you a rundown on your boat. Tinker on land as much as possible prior to your trip.
  • Don’t leave home without the tools and spare parts to get jobs done quickly on the go.
  • Study your boat’s sink, shower, and toilets to understand how they operate and what to do if there are leaks or clogs.
  • Your yacht’s electrical system powers everything from your lights and appliances to your navigational instruments. Study boating manuals and know what batteries on your model need to be prioritized, and how long they last. Again, try for hands-on tinkering where possible.
  1. Entertainment Options
  • Think about how you’ll spend your downtime on the boat in between ports and pack up whatever you’ll need for rainy days, including books, board games, cards, laptops, movies, music, and more.
  • Find out ahead of time what your fellow passengers are most looking forward to during the trip. If your goals aren’t all that aligned, it might be worth reconsidering the duration of the trip, or postponing the trip until all parties are “on board”, so to speak.
  • If you’ll be working or otherwise checking in with the office from time to time, make sure you have all the supplies you need to earn a living while at sea if need be.
  1. SafetyChecks
  • Ensure everything you need for safety’s sake is accounted for. This includes life rafts, life jackets, that First Aid Kit as mentioned above, fire extinguishers, a working radio (also mentioned above), and the right anchor for the seabeds you’ll be navigating.
  • Safety also means ensuring handrails are screwed tightly in place, there are no tripping hazards anywhere, and there are no burned out exterior or interior lights.
  • Debrief everyone who will be travelling with you on the location of all safety equipment on board.
  1. Consult Your Fellow Cruisers
  • Before setting out on the journey of a lifetime, ask other boaters for their tips and suggestions. They can be especially helpful when it comes to favourite destinations, routes, durations of stays, dangerous areas, expensive cities, and so on.
  • Experienced boaters have up-to-date information as well as the wisdom of trial and error. Learn from them! If you’re new to the yachting community, start by talking to your yacht broker, chat up other boaters entering the marina and at trade shows, and check out online forums.

Be Sure the Boating Lifestyle is Right For You

enjoying life yachting around the world

There are so many things to love about life on a yacht, but it’s understandably not for everyone. Cruising can be considered physically and mentally challenging at times, especially if you’re not used to being away from home for long periods.

Before journeying out for weeks or months at a time, be absolutely certain that yachting for long durations is the right choice for you. Ask yourself, do you have a passion for the outdoors and will you be happy constantly being at the mercy of Mother Nature?

Experiment with any long range cruising “thresholds” you might have by staying close to shore for extended periods at a time before heading out for longer ocean crossings to see how you manage.

When yachting, you might have to contend with things like:

  • sea sickness (yourself or your passengers)
  • cooking and sleeping while the boat is rocking
  • not being able to follow a strict schedule
  • not being able to make quick trips to the mall or grocery store
  • missing family and friends back home
  • anxiety around stormy, rough oceans
  • never feeling like your clothing is completely dry
  • giving up your regular spa treatments and gym membership

Fortunately, today’s modern yachts provide so many luxuries and comforts that long range cruising can be made ultra-comfortable. From laundry machines to dishwashers and smartphone chargers, to enclosed decks and enough storage for all of life’s necessities on board, modern luxury motor yachts present today’s boaters with everything they need to experience life at home while out at sea.

Many of the yachts for sale at Van Isle Marina are suitable for long range cruising, whether that’s up and down the coastline, or across continents. We hope the above suggestions help you plan for smooth sailing and the trip of a lifetime. Contact us for more information on any of the above or to learn more about our boats for sale.

How to choose the right yacht

Choosing the Right Yacht For Your Needs

On the Market for Your First Yacht? Here are 10 Things to Ask Yourself

There are a lot of different types of yachts out there. Here’s how to narrow down the selection and find the right yacht for you.

While it’s tempting to go off things like looks and speed alone, there’s plenty more that goes into deciding on your first yacht. Check out our quick guide for first-time yacht buyers, designed to help you choose the best yacht for your needs.

Deciding on what type of yacht to buy starts with the answers to a few quick questions, such as:sailing yachts vs motor yachts

1. Would you prefer a sailing yacht or a motor yacht?

Yachts are divided into two main categories: sailing yachts and motor yachts. A sailing yacht offers a quieter ride and a more economical method of powering your vessel (the wind!) while a motor yacht is faster, more intuitive to operate for many, and typically has more accommodation and entertaining space on board.

Determining if you want to buy a sailing yacht or a motor yacht helps you eliminate half the yachts on the market!

2. How will you be spending the majority of your time on your yacht?

Today’s yachts are built for many different purposes, such as fishing, watersports, cruising, entertaining, year-round living, or a combination of all of the above. If you’ll mainly be using your yacht for fishing, for example, look for a boat with a large self-draining cockpit, several storage bins for your tackle, and even rod holders.

Sporting yachts will have large swim platforms and lots of storage for equipment, while yachts built for long-range cruising and entertaining might have crew quarters or an extra bedroom. Yachts intended for year-round living will have extras like laundry machines, a dishwasher, and a larger power supply and water-holding capacity.

3. How far and how fast would you like to go?selecting a yacht - van isle marina

The answer to this question dictates things like how much fuel and water-holding capacity you’ll need on board, as well as how powerful your motors ought to be. There are yachts intended specifically for long-range cruising that are quieter and have better fuel consumption, for example.

If you’ll be at sea for long durations of time, consider a model that provides plenty of protection from the elements beyond that just offered on the accommodation level, so you can still entertain and enjoy the views.

4. What is your budget?

When budgeting for a yacht, you must account for things like moorage fees, fuel fees, insurance fees, repair and maintenance fees, and add-ons like safety equipment, tenders, and anchors – these costs might factor into how much you should realistically be spending on your boat.

In general, the bigger the budget, the bigger and newer the yacht, but a larger budget doesn’t always equal a larger boat. For example, you might opt for something newer with more luxury features but sacrifice a bit in the size of the yacht. So, determine your budget first, then your priorities. If funds are limited, decide:

  1. new and luxurious, but smaller; or
  2. older and simpler, but larger?

5. Are you comfortable with an older model, or prefer brand-new?

The answer to this question goes hand in hand with the question regarding your budget. The pros and cons of buying a new vs. used yacht are the same as buying any used vehicle. If you decide to buy used, be sure to read our guide to Buying a Pre-Owned Yacht to understand what’s involved in the process.

6. How experienced are you operating a boat?

If you are a new boater and ease of operation is high on your list of wants and needs, look for a yacht model that touts features such as single-interface touchscreen technology and EJS joystick manoeuvrability that make navigation and docking a breeze. Likewise, you may want to skip some of the added features like side thrusters until you get a handle on the basics.

If you’ll be giving up the captain’s chair to other people from time to time, it becomes more important to look for a yacht that is simple and intuitive to operate.

7. Who will be spending the most time on your yacht?choosing the right yacht - family activities

Think about who you will be bringing on board your yacht. If you’ll be entertaining guests frequently, room for everyone to spread out and enjoy themselves should be high on the priority list. Find this level of luxury on yachts with more than one entertainment zone. Open and enclosed flybridge models provide added entertaining space, as do the mezzanine areas of several luxury yacht models on the market right now.

If seniors and children will be on board, you’ll want enhanced safety features all around – things like lots of lighting, plenty of handrails, and wide side decks can help guests feel safe. Wheelchair accessibility is another thing to keep in mind.

8. Will you be spending a lot of overnights on your yacht?

Most yachts have at minimum a queen-sized berth that sleeps 2 comfortably. If you plan on yachting with friends and family overnight, you’ll want something with enough sleeping quarters for everyone – but this doesn’t always equate to a guest room. Sometimes a convertible day bed can meet everyone’s needs.

Yachts in the 45 to 65 foot range have up to four bedrooms and three bathrooms, with enough convertible lounges and daybeds to comfortably sleep 8-16 people.

9. How big of a boat do you realistically need?

Remember that the bigger the boat, the bigger the fuel consumption in many cases. Also in some cases, bigger boats are tougher to navigate, especially if you’ll be moored at a busy marina. And if you’ll be storing on dry land, you’ll need to consider storage options large enough for your yacht. If you’re new to boating, you might consider a small yacht first, then upgrade to a larger yacht.

10. Will you be wanting to re-sell your yacht down the road?Sporting Yacht with swim platform

Ask your yacht broker for advice on the re-sale value of the models that have caught your eye. Some makes and models are in high demand but short supply due to limited numbers in production – meaning they will hold their value well into the future. If you plan on selling in a few years, consider re-sale value before buying.

Additional Tips for Choosing the Right Yacht

In some ways, buying a yacht is just like buying anything else – you’re going to feel better making such a large investment if you know you are making an informed, educated decision – so do your homework:

Read Boating Magazines and Blogs – These resources are gold mines of tips and tricks for yacht enthusiasts looking to make their first purchase.

Go to Boat Shows – Boat shows are your best chance to see hundreds of boats up close and personal. There is bound to be a few boats calling your name at each boat show you attend.

Ask Around – If you’re touring a marina and happen upon a boat owner tending to their vessel at the dock, strike up a conversation and learn more about their yacht and what they like about it. Most boaters will be happy to share.

Read Reviews – Whether they’re online or in those yachting magazines, read what other people are saying about their yachts.

Consult a Broker   Consult a yacht broker through your local marina who can connect you with owners of pre-owned yachts, review current stock with you, or present you with options that are not even on the market yet!

Take a look at Van Isle Marina’s boat and yachts for sale to start your search today! To learn more about any listed vessel, please contact us at 250.656.1138 or info@vanislemarina.com. Our experienced yacht brokers can help you choose the right yacht to fit your yachting lifestyle.

RIVIERA 64 SPORTS MOTOR YACHT

12 Things to Do on Your Riviera 64 Sports Motor Yacht

The new 64 Sports Motor Yacht Model from Riviera is set to premiere in 2020

At Van Isle Marina, we are extremely excited and looking forward to the launch of the newest yacht from Riviera – the 64 Sports Motor Yacht, debuting in 2020.

The 64 Sports Motor Yacht is the latest addition to Riviera’s long range cruising family, featuring the collection’s signature spacious cockpit, sporty looks, and sporting performance. The model’s incredible hull was designed in partnership with esteemed naval architects, Mulder Design of the Netherlands, who have created some of the world’s fastest super yachts, so we have a strong feeling this yacht is going to exceed all expectations.Riviera 64 Sports Motor Yacht

In addition to your four entertainment areas onboard, including the impressive mezzanine and cockpit, saloon, enclosed flybridge, and foredeck, the 64’ gives you the choice of three or four staterooms and the option of an aft crew cabin or extra storage space.

With so many of the luxurious features that Riviera is known for also on board, you and your loved ones will be able to enjoy all of your favourite yachting activities in comfort and class. While the number of things you will be able to do on board your new 64’ is virtually limitless, here are our top 12 suggestions.

1. Reel in a Big One

The 64’ Sports Motor Yacht from Riviera is an angler’s dream with its large self-draining cockpit, eight rod holders on the aft rail, and an enormous amount of storage space for your tackle and daily catches. There are large tackle lockers in the transom, more lockers in the side coaming, and deep fish bins in the floor.

For the more serious fishermen, an optional live bait tank can be plumbed right into the transom in lieu of the standard wet locker.

2. Go for a Swim

Enjoy the large swimming platform off the back of your yacht after dropping anchor near or far from the shoreline. The wide and deep boarding and swimming platform comes with an inbuilt swim ladder, making swimming off the back of your yacht a breeze. Just add some floaties and you’re good to go!

Remember to always keep an eye on the children onboard, wear waterproof sunscreen, and encourage wearing life jackets.

3. Prepare Home-cooked Meals

Whether it’s in your thoughtfully laid-out gourmet galley, or outdoors grilling up the catch of the day in the BBQ centre, cooking onboard the 64’ Sports Motor Yacht will be just like cooking at home, or better!

Cook up a huge feast for all your guests in your C-shaped kitchen equipped with a full-height refrigerator with two freezer drawers, a three-burner electric cooktop, twin sinks, dishwasher, and microwave convection oven.

The triangular working area is so efficiently set up on this model and the nearby saloon means plenty of room for you to socialize with guests while preparing the dinner.

4. Day Trip the Beach

front of the 64 riviera sports motor yachtWhile cruising up and down the coastlines, why not head back to shore for a few hours? Doing so is easy using your 3.6-metre tender with 50hp jet. Simply launch it via a low-profile davit from your foredeck.

Stuck on where to go? From Van Isle Marina in Sidney, BC – where you will be acquainted with your new yacht as soon as she arrives from Australia – head north to any of our favourite boat-only destinations on and around Vancouver Island.

From any of our spectacular beaches, you can go for a hike, do some birdwatching, and simply appreciate the beautiful nature all around you.

5. Watersports

The 64’ Sports Motor Yacht is designed for the ultimate mix of watersports by delivering a ton of storage space for your water toys, including your stand-up paddleboards, kayaks, and snorkelling and diving equipment.

6. Whale Watching

Watch for whales from practically anywhere on your yacht, but especially the foredeck, where there is a large lounge area and ample leg room for all. Don’t forget the binoculars and a camera to take photos or videos!

7. Cool Off

Life on a yacht typically means a lot of time spent outdoors. After eating breakfast, followed by hours in the sun, at the end of the day you’re likely to want a place to cool off.

Not to worry, the 64’ allows plenty of shelter from the sun, while still allowing you to view the outdoors with the one-way-vision glass panels extending from the cabin superstructure.

Additionally, the mezzanine can be enclosed and the air-conditioning cranked for maximum cooling comfort when you’re craving the cold. You can find similar relief in any of the staterooms.

8. Cocktail Party

Turn your cockpit into a cocktail party easily enough with the nearby wet bar that includes a 190-litre refrigerator, 100-litre icebox, and sink.

An adjacent BBQ centre with twin barbecue plates and fibreglass benchtop ensure there’s enough space to prepare appetizers to go with the cocktails. The conversation will soon be flowing around the folding feature teak  table.

If it’s wine you would rather, choose something from your 27-bottle wine fridge within your galley – where there is also a glass storage area.

9. Host a Child’s Birthday Party

Be the coolest mom, dad, or grandparent around by hosting your child or grandchild’s birthday party on board your yacht this year. We believe it will be one of the most memorable parties they’ve ever had!

After an afternoon of fun in the sun, there’s plenty enough room to keep everyone together for games and snacks with the galley, foredeck, or mezzanine. You’ll be able to keep an eye on everyone from the saloon. For supervising the littles ones, there is plush seating for four or five guests on the port side of the saloon, along with three director’s chairs and more seating at the starboard-side dinette.

64 sports motor yacht

10. Retreat to Relaxation

After a long day enjoying the water, head up to the enclosed flybridge to your first-class lounge where you can sit back, relax, and marvel at the beauty of the Pacific Northwest coastlines all around you. When you’re ready to tune-out completely, you can do so with your favourite show or sports team on the flybridge’s large flat screen TV – which is just one of a few TVs onboard.

11. Go Bluewater Cruising

The Riviera 64’ Sports Motor Yacht is designed for some serious bluewater cruising, with a massive 22.5kW genset, 6500-litre fuel tank capacity, and standard twin MAN V8 1300hp (970 kW) diesels.

And did we say storage? On top of the storage mentioned in the cockpit, the staterooms offer 9 storage areas in total, while the foredeck offers heaps more storage space so you’ll be able to store everything you need for weeks and months out on the open water.

For safety’s sake, take comfort in the model’s life raft and safety cell, which are housed at the rear of the bridge.

12. Do Your Laundry & Sleep Soundly

If you’ll be yachting for extended periods – just what the 64’ Sports Motor Yacht is designed for – you’ll appreciate the model’s large laundry closet with separate washer and dryer.

Exhausted from a day outdoors, when you retire for the evening, you’ll find the accommodations onboard the 64’ to be spacious, luxurious, and comfortable. You’ll feel so well rested after being lulled to sleep in your full-beam master stateroom complete with a central king-sized bed with plush headboard.

You’ll also appreciate the comfort of the room’s lush carpet, elegant LED lighting overhead, bedside tables, 40-inch LED TV, and large hull picture windows. Your guests are also sure to sleep well in their VIP guest stateroom with a queen-sized bed or the additional guest stateroom with two adult-sized single beds.

To learn more about this exciting new model, contact our yacht brokers at 250.656.1138.

Read More:

More Information on the Riviera Sports Motor Yacht Collection

With the addition of the 64’ coming in 2020, the Riviera Sports Motor Yacht Line is now up to four models. The new 64’ fits nicely in between the 68 Sports Motor Yacht, which debuted in 2017, and the 72 Sports Motor Yacht, which debuted in 2018, giving new owners a more mid-size option.

So why add to the line? Riviera saw plenty of success with its earlier Sports Motor Yacht models, and the 64’ is already garnering plenty of interest worldwide.

“The Sports Motor Yacht philosophy has been well embraced the world over, with over 20 yachts purchased by owners in Europe, the Americas, New Zealand and Australia over the past 18 months,” stated Rodney Longhurst, Riviera Australia owner, in a press release. “Our highly experienced international design team has risen to the challenge of optimizing the onboard space, ensuring the yacht offers beauty, amenity and functionality,” he adds.

As with all Riviera models, this newest addition also has a glass cockpit, touchscreen displays, fingertip joystick control, electric steering, and state of the art electronic and engine systems. You won’t believe how incredibly fun and easy to operate Riviera Sports Motor Yachts can be!

Additional Riviera Collections

In addition to the Sports Motor Yacht collection, Riviera offers models in the Open and Enclosed Flybridge Collections, the Sports Yacht Collection, and the SUV Collection. As Western Canada’s exclusive authorized dealer of Riviera Australia’s luxury motor yachts, Van Isle Marina’s yacht brokers would be pleased to match you with the best Riviera yacht to suit your needs.

Find more information on each of Riviera yachts on our website, or contact one of our Yacht Sales Brokers, at 250.656.1138. You can also come to Sidney, BC to see us in person. We look forward to showing you our boats!

 

Riviera Yacht Owner Spotlight

Riviera Yacht Owner Spotlight

Riviera Yacht Owners Sandy and Beth Seney

Riviera Yacht Owners - Beth and Sandy Seney

Riviera Yachts are designed and built in Queensland, Australia, at the largest luxury yacht building facility in the Southern Hemisphere.  Their yachts are highly sought after around the world for their high performance, fuel efficiency, luxurious finishing touches, smart layouts, and soft-riding, sure-footed hulls.

As Western Canada’s exclusive authorized dealer of Riviera Australia motor yachts, we at Van Isle Marina are here to help you find the best Rivera model to meet your needs, just like we helped Sandy and Beth Seney, who were recently featured in Experience, Riviera’s digital magazine.

Riviera & Belize Yachts

Avid motor yacht enthusiasts from Vancouver, BC, the couple shared their story of how they came to be the proud owners of a brand new Riviera 52 Enclosed Flybridge. Our team at Van Isle Marina was pleased to support them in their journey to becoming Riviera owners.

“We saw the Riviera 52 at a local boat show and immediately decided she was what we wanted,” Sandy recalls of how they decided which motor yacht would meet all of their needs.Sandy and Beths Riviera 52 Enclosed Flybridge

One of the standout features of the 52 Enclosed Flybridge model that appealed to Sandy and Beth was the internal staircase to the flybridge, as well as the glass-enclosed flybridge itself. “No more plastic windows!” Sandy noted.

The flybridge of the 52 also features forward and rear lounges, a wet bar, and twin seats in the helm – another standout feature for the couple, who appreciate that there is no helm station in the saloon, giving them more space in the living area.

Additional features on the Riviera 52 Enclosed Flybridge motor yacht include three staterooms, two bathrooms, large boarding platform, barbeque and wet bar station, laundry closet, wide side decks, anchoring station, rear glass bulkhead, premium finishes, the best brands in audio and video equipment, and joystick steering that makes operating this model extra simple. In all, the layout of Riviera’s enclosed flybridges offer plenty of space, with the galley aft and dinette and lounge forward all on the same level.

“And we can’t get over how fast she is with the twin Volvo Penta engines and pod drives,” Sandy adds, referring to their Volvo Penta D11-IPS950s delivering 750 hp each.

The inverter, generator, and water capacity of Sandy and Beth’s desired yacht was also important to them, given they seldom go into marinas or tie up to docks. “We prefer to anchor somewhere on our own,” Sandy says.

Sandy and Beth named their new Riviera 52 Enclosed Flybridge ‘Sweet Thing’, after an expression Beth’s mother once used to describe Sandy. She tells Riviera magazine: “My mother referred to everyone as either a ‘sweet thing’ or an ‘interesting character’. It was not good to be known as an ‘interesting character’! “Fortunately, she referred to Sandy as a ‘sweet thing’. Hence the name,” Beth shares.

After selecting the 52 Enclosed Flybridge out from a crowd of other boats during a boat show, the pair enlisted the services of Van Isle Marina to help them acquire the yacht and make it theirs. They visited the Riviera yard in Australia on a number of occasions, taking a keen interest in the build of their investment. Riviera offers this option to owners who have bought brand new and are customizing their models, which is all part of the exclusive Riviera Experience.

The couple spent some time inspecting the build of their new yacht as she was being built at the company’s headquarters in south-east Queensland, Australia. Their final visit to the yard was to sea trial the motor yacht before her delivery to Canada. With the sea trial proving more than successful, the last step was simply waiting patiently for her delivery.

Sandy and Beth’s motor yacht was delivered to us here at Van Isle Marina, where we presented it to our very happy clients who were eager to get out exploring. And with all the comforts and conveniences Riviera is known for, it’s easy to see how Sandy and Beth were able to spend eight weeks out on the water exploring the Pacific Northwest upon receiving their Riviera.

One of their first anchorages was Princess Louisa Inlet, a small narrow fjord nearly 100 nautical miles north of Vancouver. Then they headed north to Desolation Sound, a vast, protected waterway with seemingly endless small islands to navigate.

Continuing north, they traveled through Johnstone Strait and on to the Broughton Archipelago, leading toward Pierre’s Echo Bay Marina. These are just a few of several stops the pair made during their maiden voyage – the first of many to come.

Sandy and Beth look forward to sharing their Riviera with their children and their grandchildren this summer as they explore even more of the hidden gems around the west coast, especially all the protected and spectacular bays, inlets, and sounds that make up the waterways of the Pacific Northwest.

Riviera Yacht Owners RendezvousAnnual Riviera Rendezvous

If you decide to follow Sandy and Beth’s path and come to own a Riviera yacht, you’ll be joining a growing group of ecstatic yacht owners who meet regularly to share their adventures and boating knowledge. One such event is called the annual Riviera Rendezvous that takes place each year in June.

At this highly anticipated event, dozens of Riviera yacht owners meet up for an entire weekend to catch up with old friends and welcome new Riviera yacht owners into the family. The 2019 Riviera Rendezvous took place on June 7-9 with Emerald Pacific Yachts in Roche Harbor, a sheltered harbor on the northwest side of San Juan Island in San Juan County, Washington.

Check out the recap from the 2019 Riviera Rendezvous.

As always, the Riviera Rendezvous was an outstanding success bringing together Riviera owners from the Pacific Northwest to enjoy a festive weekend together. With more than 160 people and 44 Riviera Yachts in attendance, proud owners celebrated the ‘Silver Screen’ as movie stars with a potluck, dock parties, seminars, and a catered dinner. It was entertaining and an excellent opportunity to connect with the Riviera family.

The entire Van Isle Marina team is looking forward to celebrating Riviera’s 40th anniversary at the next Riviera Rendezvous happening in June 2020.

Read More: 8 Things You’ll Love About Living on a Yacht

Riviera’s 15th Motor Yacht

Riviera has 14 – soon to be 15 – different motor yacht models available across 5 distinct collections, including the Open and Enclosed Flybridge Collections, the Sport Yacht and the Sport Motor Yacht Collections, and the SUV Collection. As Western Canada’s exclusive authorized dealer of Riviera Australia’s luxury motor yachts, Van Isle Marina’s yacht brokers would be pleased to present you with more information.

You can also read about each of Riviera’s models on our website.

To help you discover what type of Riviera yacht may be right for you, Van Isle Marina is here to help. Please contact one of our Yacht Sales Brokers, call us at 250.656.1138, or come to Sidney BC to see us in person. We look forward to showing you our boats!

Boat Only Destinations Around Vancouver Island Canada

Boat Access Only Tourist Spots

Best Boat Only Destinations Around Vancouver Island

Who doesn’t love the beauty and serenity that a secluded beach, only accessible by boat, provides? At Van Isle Marina, we love spending days or weeks at a time aboard our boats exploring the Pacific Northwest, particularly the many islands and coves around Vancouver Island.

Sometimes, the best places are stumbled upon by accident, when you weren’t even looking for them, but there are a few places that should definitely be on your boating bucket list. Here are our top places around Vancouver Island that you can only get to by boat:

Snake Islandsnake island - accessible by boat only

Snake Island, about 6 km from Nanaimo’s Departure Bay, is a small, uninhabited island that’s popular with kayakers and canoers. Directly in the path of BC Ferries, be on high alert when navigating this region. Snake Island offers amazing diving experiences, a little lighthouse, a large population of harbour seals, beautiful sandstone overhangs, and great birdwatching opportunities.

Rugged Point Marine Park

If you’re looking for plenty of park amenities such as camping, canoeing, fishing, windsurfing, and hiking, check out Rugged Point. This provincial park is located on the west coast of northern Vancouver Island on the southwest end of Kyuquot Channel in the mouth of Kyuquot Sound. There are a variety of safe places to anchor at Rugged Point, or in nearby Dixie Cove, making this a popular destination for boaters.

Clayoquot Wilderness ResortClayoquot, Vancouver Island, Canada

For a night or two on land, consider a stay at the seasonally-operated Clayoquot Wilderness Resort – an “all-inclusive eco-safari resort” about 30 minutes by boat from Tofino. At this wilderness retreat you get the chance to stay in one of 25 great white canvas, fully-equipped prospector-style tents, and enjoy artfully prepared coastal gourmet cuisine, a spa and more.

Broken Island Group

The Broken Group of Islands in the middle of Barkley Sound is nestled in the Alberni Inlet and close to the Pacific Rim National Park – one of Canada’s most acclaimed parks. Allow several days of boating here, where you’ll enjoy 50 kilometers of fine sand beaches at the national park before or after exploring the Broken Group Islands. If you’re into fishing, check out Eagle Nook Resort for world-class, all-inclusive salmon and fishing charters. Located amongst the Broken Group of Islands and accessible only by boat or seaplane, this remote 5-star fishing vacation is certainly something you’ll want to add to your itinerary.

Grant Bay

Grant Bay, located on the northwest coast of Vancouver Island near Port Hardy, is a white sand secluded beach that technically can be accessed by a drive and a hike, but we believe it’s much more fun to bypass all that by using a boat.

To get there from Winter Harbour, where there is a boat launch if need be, bear right at Mathews Island, continue up the inlet, bear left, tie up safely on the beach and follow the trail through the forest about 30 minutes. You’re there when you see a wide expanse of West Coast sandy beach. You might also see whales and sea otters, both of which are common in the area.

Sandy Island

Sandy Island Marine Park, known locally as Tree Island, is located on the northern tip of Denman Island. Access is boat-only, or by foot from Denman Island at low tide. Sandy Island offers great birdwatching and sandy beaches suitable for sunbathing and swimming.

Ahousahtboat only access to Ahousaht Flores Island

Ahousaht, located in a small bay on the east side of Flores Island in Clayoquot Sound, is the largest of the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations with more than 2,000 members. At Ahousaht you’ll also find the Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve, home to a diverse ecosystem and a rare ancient temperate rain forest. Take a reprieve from life at sea. Moor the boat and take a stay at the Aauuknuk Lodge or the Lone Cone Hostel and Campground located on Meares Island.

Vargas Island Provincial Park

Vargas Island Provincial Park in Clayoquot Sound is located immediately northwest of Tofino and west of Meares Island on the west coast of Vancouver Island. This park offers great paddling, camping, and wildlife viewing. Also be on the lookout for Gray whales around Ahous Bay in the spring.

On the shorelines of Vargas Island, you’ll see an exposed rocky coast, sandy beaches, sheltered channels and bays, an intertidal lagoon, and ancient sand berms – rows of crescent-shaped sand mounds that indicate earlier sea levels.

Desolation Sound Marine Provincial ParkDesolation Sound - accessible by boat

Chances are you’ve already heard about or been to Desolation Sound Marine Provincial Park – a boater’s paradise, with its calm waters, vistas, and more than 60 km of shoreline to discover. There are three major destination anchorages that make up Desolation Sound: Prideaux Haven, Tenedo’s Bay and Grace Harbour. This place is popular, but there is plenty of room for everyone.

Refuge Cove

Refuge Cove in the heart of Desolation Sound is a remote community of around 30 full-time residents with a great summertime burger joint, general store, and campsites. They also offer free four-hour moorage, or overnight stays for a small fee.

Roscoe Bay and Squirrel CoveSquirrel Cove - arrive by boat

While near Desolation Sound, we also recommend visiting nearby Roscoe Bay and Squirrel Cove, both northwest of Desolation. Note that swimming in Roscoe Bay isn’t recommended. Instead, take a 1-2 hour hike and enjoy a freshwater swim at nearby Black Lake.

Lasqueti Island

Lasqueti Island lies off the east coast of Vancouver Island in the Powell River Regional District. It has a population of around 500 people who all live off-grid. There are no public campgrounds on the island, but there are numerous provincial parks on the perimeters of the island, including Squitty Bay Provincial Park. The waters around this area are ideal for cold water scuba diving.

Protection Island

Protection Island, about a 15-minute ferry ride from the harbour city of Nanaimo, is home to around 350 full-time residents. The main mode of transportation on the island is golf carts. On Protection Island you’ll definitely have to check out the Dinghy Dock pub, which is Canada’s only floating pub. There are also tons of beaches and wildlife viewing opportunities on this small island.

New Castle and Gabriola Islands

Also in the Nanaimo area is New Castle Island, a popular place for kayakers who are launching from Nanaimo, and Gabriola Island, or Isle of the Arts, which is a small town of around 4,000 people, including many artists.

Mudge Island

Between Vancouver Island and Gabriola Island you’ll also find Mudge Island, a small island with 50-65 full-time residents and a public park (South Beach), but no ferry service or stores. Mudge is on the northern tip of Dodd Narrows, which means strong currents, whirlpools and back eddies, so proceed with caution! Also be mindful of the reef running through nearby False Narrows.

Hot Springs Coveboat or plane only access - Hot Springs Cove, Vancouver Island

Hot Springs Cove in Maquinna Provincial Park northwest of Tofino in Clayoquot Sound – a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve – are geothermal hot springs backed by amazing scenery. To access the hot springs, anchor the boat and then enjoy a 2km walk along well-maintained boardwalks and wooden stairs through lush rainforest to get to the natural hot springs. There, you can take a long soak.

Additional Destinations Recommended by Pacific Yachting

In addition to the items on our list, check out Pacific Yachting’s 7 Best Boat-Access-Only Beaches in the Gulf Islands, which features:

The boating experts here at Van Isle Marina are very familiar with these and many other great destinations for boating in the Pacific Northwest. We’d also love to hear about the places you love boating around Vancouver Island! We look forward to welcoming you to our docks and helping you find the best new or pre-owned boat or yacht to match your boating lifestyle.

Sailing Essentials Important Items to Bring on Your Boat

Sailing Essentials

Important Items to Bring on Your Boat

Packing for a boating trip is not unlike packing for an airplane ride. It begins with creating a list, packing your bags, and then anxiously hoping you haven’t forgotten anything!

If you’re new to boating, use our list below as a starting point, noting that the items you’ll wish to bring will vary based on the length of your trip and the current and forecasted weather conditions.

Here’s a list of items that you absolutely need to have with you every time you’re out on a boat.

Passport & Boating Documents

Make sure your insurance papers, boating licence, and registration are all on board, as well as some form of photo ID, particularly your passport if you will be boating internationally.  Read about what type of boating licences are required.

Soft-sided Luggage

Try and get everything into soft-sided luggage like a duffel bag or backpack in order to maximize storage space on board. Hard luggage is more difficult to fit into closets and cabinets.

Smaller Grab-Bag

Items of importance, such as your wallet, cash, keys, passport, prescription meds, credit cards, and phone should all be stored in a small bag that is easy to grab and go in the case of an emergency. Also include in this bag a printed list of emergency contact names and phone numbers, your insurance policy number and number, and doctor names and numbers.

Sunscreenyachting essentials - sunscreen

We hope this one goes without saying! Always pack more sunscreen than you ever think you’ll need. Choose non-oil-based sunscreens in order to protect your yacht’s upholstery and wooden finishes as much as possible. Lip balm with SPF and insect repellent are also recommended.

Sunglasses

While sunglasses are recommended for passengers, they are essentially a must-have for drivers.  The sun can be particularly blinding while boating as the rays reflect off the water. Sunglasses also shield a boat operator’s eyes from splashing water so they can stay focused on the task at hand.

Polaroid sunglasses with UV protection can further reduce the amount of glare coming into your eyes from reflected light, allowing your iris to stay open wider and improving your sight.

Some sailors even swear by having goggles on board for when the weather turns really bad and you need protection from heavy rains but without the shaded lenses. 

Ziplock Bagsyachting essential - dry bag

Ziplock bags or dry bags are great for more than just keeping money and electronics dry during day trips to the beach. You can also use Ziplock bags for dirty or wet clothes, and for sealing opened bags of snacks! Never underestimate all the uses there are for Ziplock bags on any type of trip.

Prescriptions & Seasickness Pills

If you’re prone to seasickness – and many people are no matter how often they go boating – consider packing seasickness or anti-nausea medication. Remember to also bring enough of your prescription medications for longer trips.

First Aid Kit

Always make sure your watertight or waterproof first aid kit is fully stocked before heading out, and includes all the usual suspects such as gauze, bandages, aspirin, antibiotic ointment and gloves. Flares, matches, a water-resistant flashlight and fire extinguishers are also a must.

When you buy a yacht through Van Isle Marina, our yacht brokers will make sure you know about all of the safety gear you are required to have on board.

Headlamp

Speaking of flashlights, bring an additional light on board that is kept separate from the first aid kit. Even better, a headband light for hands-free chart navigation and engine space inspections is extremely handy. Don’t forget to bring extra batteries!

Entertainment

Consider bringing DVDs and CDs with you to enjoy, which are more reliable than streaming services and don’t require special devices that need recharging. By all means, bring your tablet and smartphones too – most yachts will have a charging station or two. Also remember games, playing cards, pens and paper, and a few books and magazines.

Binoculars and cameras can also come in handy; binoculars for birdwatching and cameras for sunsets.yachting essentials - binoculars

Sailing Knife and Marlinspike

For safety and convenience, consider carrying a knife and marlinspike secured to your belt with a lanyard. The knife is handy for cutting through sailing rope and the marlinspike can help pry open strands of rope for splicing. Folding knives with a three-inch blade and marlinspike work in a pinch, but a straight blade rigging knife and a separate marlinspike in a sheath is better in emergencies.

Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)

Make sure there are enough PFDs for everyone on board, in the appropriate sizes. Inform everyone on board where the PFDs are stowed.

Hats

Bring more than one cap or hat on board to protect you from the sun, cold, and rain. Consider a large-brimmed hat for sunny weather, and a breathable, microfibre material cap for nighttime watches to keep you warm.

Spare Clothes

Without overpacking to the extreme, we recommend bringing spare clothing, like a spare pair of shoes and a backup bathing suit. In the event that things get wet (as they happen to do aboard a boat!) and don’t have a chance to dry out, having extra sets will certainly increase your comfort on board.

Rainy Weather Gear

When it rains, you’ll want more than just a hat. For longer boating trips, bring a raincoat, bib-pants, thick socks, and sea boots geared to the conditions in which you’ll be cruising. Whether it’s warm or cold weather, go for modern microfiber synthetic layers, including thermal underwear and a neck warmer for better comfort.

Gloves

If you’ll be sailing and using sailing lines, gloves are going to be a must to prevent blistered, rope-burned hands. Full-length sailing gloves cover everything except the tips of your fingers and provide the best protection when working sailing sheets, halyards, and anchoring rode.

Personal Locator Beacon

A Personal Locator Beacon or Personal Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) is a small hand-held device that allows you to transmit a distress signal directly to the authorities in case of an emergency. Your yacht comes equipped with an EPIRP, but personal EPIRPs are available as added peace of mind.

Some types of these devices are available with strobe lights, which can greatly assist during man-overboard situations.

Hand-held GPS Unit

A hand-held GPS unit could be handy for anyone acting as backup to the skipper, or for use on shore for day hikes, for example.

Food

Unless you plan on catching your own food every day that you’re on board, make sure your galley is stocked with enough sustenance for the duration of your trip, or enough to get you to the nearest port.

Fishing Tackle

Does your tackle box need a top up?

Items to Leave on Your Boat

Some items only have to be packed onto your boat once, when you first acquire your boat:

  • Kitchen supplies like cookware, utensils, cups, plates, bowls etc
  • Beach towels and bathing towels
  • Cleaning supplies (vacuum cleaner and mop)
  • Toiletries

When it comes to packing for a boating trip, we hope the above list helps you determine what is most important to bring. Many of the yachts for sale at Van Isle Marina come with more than enough storage space for you to leave some of these items on board year-round. We also have storage lockers available to further assist with your boating supplies while you moor with us.

boat types - when is a yacht a yacht

When is a Boat a Yacht?

Yacht Sizes, Types, Styles & Categories

With so many different types of yachts to choose from, it can be hard to know your Flybridges from your Tri-Decks if you’re just starting your search. Although there is a growing number of terms used to describe the different types of yachts out there, many of the terms overlap or are used interchangeably.

If you’re on the market for a yacht, the team here at Van Isle Marina has compiled a review of the different terms you’ll likely come across when cruising through yachts for sale.

definition of a yacht - megayacht

a luxury motoryacht

Below is our brief guide to understanding the different terms the boating community has been known to use to describe yachts.

Definition of a Yacht

What exactly makes a yacht a yacht, and not just a big boat? There is no nailed down definition of what makes a yacht a yacht, but most boaters consider a yacht to be any type of sea vessel that is used strictly for recreational or pleasure purposes like cruising, entertaining, water sports, fishing, or year-round accommodations.

Yachts are usually large enough to have some form of sleeping quarters (cabin) on board for overnight trips as well as a kitchen (galley) and a bathroom (head). They are also large enough that they require more than human inputs (i.e rowing) to propel forward.

Yachts are classed by many things, including their mode of propulsion, size, style, amenities, and function.

General Types of Yachts

Definition of a Yacht - Sailing Yacht

a sailing yacht

A yacht is first defined either as a sailing yacht, motor yacht, or gulet yacht, and then as a sports or luxury yacht.

  • Sailing Yacht: a yacht mainly propelled via wind and sails
  • Motor Yacht: a yacht propelled via one or more motors
  • Gulet Yacht: a hybrid yacht with both sails and motors
  • Open Yacht, Cruiser, Cabin Cruiser, Express Cruiser: an otherwise uncategorized standard yacht for cruising and entertaining
  • Luxury Yacht: a yacht that includes high-end finishes and features and the latest in modern performance technology. The term ‘luxury’ can precede any type of yacht, i.e. “luxury motor yacht”, “luxury sailing yacht”, etc.
  • Sports Yacht: a yacht geared towards fishing, water sports, or cruising with a sleeker design and more powerful motor for faster cruising speeds. The term ‘sports’ can precede other types of yachts as well, i.e. “sports motor yacht”.
  • Catamaran Yacht: a yacht with two hulls (pontoons) often made of fiberglass that can be used in shallow waters.

    Definition of a yacht - Catamaran

    a catamaran

Yacht Sizes

Yachts can further be defined as a superyacht or megayacht, depending on their size.

  • Superyachts are typically 24 meters (78 feet) and above.
  • Megayachts are typically over 80 meters (260 feet).

Most motor yachts on the market are typically 24 meters (78 feet) or less.  There are only a handful of megayachts in the world due to their extravagant price tag.

Yacht Style Categories

Yachts can further be grouped or defined according to their form and function, such as with flybridge, sedan, pilot house, and sportfish yachts, for example.

  • Classic Motor Yacht: a yacht that was built between the 1920s and 1970s (before today’s modern technology began dominating modern yacht manufacturing). A modern yacht can be built based on the classic motor yacht style.
  • Sedan: a popular yacht style with deck space above the hull and living quarters below. The living quarters of a sedan yacht are enclosed and single-level.
  • Flybridge: a sedan-style yacht with an open deck and more comfortable living space above the main bridge of a vessel.
  • Daybridge: a multi-level yacht that is even more open than a flybridge. Belize Motoryachts are known for creating this distinctive style of yacht.
  • Open or Enclosed: a term used to describe the layout of and access to the flybridge. In an enclosed flybridge, access to the above flybridge is enclosed inside the living space. In an open flybridge, access to the flybridge above is open to the elements.
  • Downeast Style: a low-profile yacht with a large working cockpit and small helm station. This highly recognizable style is inspired by the mid-1900s traditional Maine lobster boat. Back Cove yachts are a shining example of downeast-style inspired yachts.
  • Pilothouse: A multi-deck yacht like a flybridge with a larger interior main deck. See the Offshore 62 Pilot House as an example.
  • Sky Lounge: an enclosed area at the top of the vessel that provides the benefits of the view but with several amenities, protection from the elements, expansive windows and sometimes a sunroof.
  • Cockpit Motor Yacht: a yacht with more cockpit space than deck space.
  • Sportfish or Sport Fishing Yacht: A yacht used for fishing with a large cockpit, storage space, and the ability to handle rougher seas. These can also be referred to as Flybridge Sportfish or Sportfish Express and are built for longer durations out on the water.
  • Convertible: a yacht that combines features of a standard motor yacht with a sportfish yacht to have entertaining space when you need it, and also fishing space when you need it.
  • SUV: a yacht that combines features of a standard motor yacht and sport yacht. See the Riviera 575 SUV to learn more about this emerging style of yacht.
  • Tri-Decks: a superyacht with three levels of staggered, enclosed living space.
  • Expedition Yachts: a large yacht with a deeper displacement hull for more stability and comfort during longer-range trips.

Read a few descriptions of yachts for sale and you’ll soon realize the boating community sometimes seems to have its own language. To accompany this roundup of yacht types, check out our Parts of a Boat post for more information, or jump right into checking out some of the models we at Van Isle Marina have for sale right now.

cleaning fish on a boat

Cleaning Fish on a Boat

A Step-by-Step Guide on How to Clean a Fish While On Your Boat

It’s never the best part of the fishing experience, and it’s often a thankless task, but someone on board the boat has got to do it. We’re talking about cleaning your catch. Knowing how to clean a fish properly is something every fisherman should know how to do. It’s the first step in getting your fish to taste delicious, after all.

When do you need to clean your fish?

Try and clean your fish within an hour or two of catching it, or at the very least, on the day you catch it – this is true even if you are planning on freezing the fish eventually. If you’ll be out fishing for several days on your yacht, it will be important you have everything you need on board to easily clean your catch right there on the boat. Fortunately, you don’t need much to clean a fish.

Here’s our quick guide to cleaning a fish on board your boat:

To clean a fish, you’ll need a:

how to clean a fish on your boat

  • Sanitary work station
  • Dull butter knife, spoon or fork for removing scales
  • Sharp knife for gutting your fish
  • Bucket to collect your fish guts
  • Clean ice bucket to collect your clean fish
  • Newspaper or plastic lining (optional)
  • Clean running water
  • A fish or two worthy of getting your hands dirty

Cleaning a fish in 7 easy steps

Step 1: Bleed the Fish

A fish should be bled when you first catch it to preserve the flavour of the meat and to make for a cleaner gutting experience. To do so, make a shallow incision under the fish’s gills. Snap its head back, breaking the spinal cord, then thread a rope through its mouth and out the gills. Allow the fish to bleed out into the water. Put the fresh catch on ice. Keep it there until you’re ready for the next steps.

Step 2: Prepare Your Materials

Lay out some newspaper on your sanitized workspace to help absorb liquids spilling from the fish and onto the floor. Do your fish cleaning outdoors if possible as it’s going to get messy! Use gloves if you prefer and have them handy.

Have your bag or bucket nearby to collect the bones, fins, head, and guts of the fish.

Inspect your fish for signs of diseases, including spots, sores, wounds, and discolouration before proceeding.

Step 3: Remove Scales

Remove the scales from your cold fish using a dull knife, fork, or spoon. From the tail towards the head, use a raking motion working against the direction of the scales. Do both sides of the fish, as well as the top and bottom.

Don’t worry if you can’t remove all the scales (they are not harmful to consume) – just aim for most of them because they don’t taste very good.

If you’re dealing with a thick-skinned fish, consider skinning it instead of descaling. To do this, cut a 1-inch notch where the top of the fish’s head connects to its body. Grip the fish at the head and simply peel the skin down to the tail. Pliers might be needed if the skin is tough.

Step 4: Remove Guts

It’s time to gut your fish. To do so, cut a long, shallow incision along the belly of the fish from the anus to the base of the gills. The incision must be shallow, or you’ll nick the intestines, making them harder and much messier to remove.

Remove the fish guts from the abdominal cavity with your fingers or scoop them out with a spoon. We told you it wasn’t going to be fun! The guts should be easy to remove, albeit unpleasant. Don’t miss anything! There might be darker membranes remaining in certain types of fish. Be sure to scrape these out as well to prevent a strong flavour and aroma from making its way into your meal.

Step 5: Remove Fins and Head

Remove the head of the fish if you plan on doing so. Cut it off from directly behind the gills. Some people choose to leave the head on the fish, and in some cooking methods – for trout especially – the head adds flavour and depth to your dish.

Next, remove the dorsal fin at the bottom of the fish (also optional) by quickly pulling it firmly towards the head. Removing the dorsal fin, if done in a swift motion, removes many small bones from your fish. You can also just cut it off.

Dispose of your fish guts responsibly. The cleaning station at the marina should have disposal bins. If you’re out on the open ocean, toss the guts back in, but if you’re in a residential area/smaller lake, it’s best to wrap these up in the newspaper and dispose of them when you’re back on shore.

Step 6: Rinse or Wipe Down the Fish

Quickly rinse the fish in cold water – inside and out – specifically rinsing off any blood, sticky scales, and other random fish bits. There are no cleaning chemicals required here – just water ought to do it. However, don’t overdo it with the water, or else you end up washing away the flavour of the fish. If you prefer, you can gently wipe the fish with a paper towel rather than rinsing it.

Step 7: Cook Your Fishhow to clean fish on a boat - salmon

Depending on your preferred cooking method, you might have more prep work to do before you can cook your fish, like filleting or cutting it into steaks, and removing its backbone prior to cooking (if you’re not BBQing or baking it whole).

Either way, you’re done cleaning and are well on your way to enjoying your catch of the day!

For tips on how to hook the fish in the first place, check out our Lures or Bait debate.

And if you think it might be a while until you catch something, why not prepare a few meals ahead of time before setting sail? Board your boat with these 5 Make-Ahead Boating Meals to tide you over until your big catch.

At Van Isle Marina in Victoria, BC, we are a big boating community who know their fish. Looking for the best fishing boat to help you catch fish in more style and comfort? Check out some of the yachts we have available for sale. We specialize in new Back Cove, Riviera, and Belize motor yachts, in addition to the many pre-owned boats for sale at our marina.